Jerome John Dobson

Jerome John Dobson began his writing career in California in the early 1960s when he joined his wife, Bridget, as head writer for the soap opera, General Hospital. Later Jerome and Bridget won multiple Emmy nominations head writing Guiding Light, As the World Turns, and Santa Barbara, which they created. In a brief two-year period, Santa Barbara was nominated for twenty-seven Emmy awards, winning eleven, both records at the time. Paricutin is his first novel.

Jared Pearce

Jared Pearce’s poems have been nominated for the Pushcart Prize, shortlisted for the Slate Roof and Blue Light Press competitions, and have won the BYU Studies Prize in Poetry. His poems have appeared in several journals in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia. The Annotated Murder of One is his debut poetry collection.

Joe Puckett

Joe Puckett, chief editor of Aubade Publishing, currently resides in Ashburn, Virginia with his wife Vonda and daughters Cosette and Emma. Although previously published in technical journals, The Dream was his first venture into nontechnical writing in 2010. Joe enjoys writing poetry for his family for special occasions, but has never been bold enough to try to publish any poems. As with all the staff at Aubade Publishing, Joe is an avid reader. His favorite novel is Ulysses by James Joyce; his favorite poet is Emily Dickinson. Joe has a touch of the Gothic in him as well—you can always find him reading Edgar Allan Poe around Halloween.

Red Hawk

Red Hawk was the Hodder Fellow in the Humanities at Princeton University in 1991–92, and is currently a professor at the University of Arkansas at Monticello. He is an award-winning author of eight poetry collections and two nonfiction spiritual self-help books. His poems have also appeared in The Atlantic, Kenyon Review, Poetry, Atlanta Review, Shenandoah, Tampa Review, and many others.

He has two terrific daughters and three splendid grandsons, and lives in Monticello, Arkansas with his sweetheart Chandrika.

Ed Meek

Ed Meek writes poetry, fiction, articles, and book reviews. High Tide is his fourth book of poems. Luck, a collection of his short stories, came out in 2017. He has been published in The Sun, The Paris Review, The North American Review, Cream City Review, The Boston Globe Magazine, and NPR’s Cognoscenti, among others. He teaches creative writing at Cambridge Center for Adult Education, helps adults prepare for the high school equivalency exam, and in his spare time, walks his dog Mookie. 

Visit Ed at https://www.edmeek.net/ 

Jane Beal

Dr. Jane Beal is a poet and professor. She was born, raised, and educated in northern California, where she received her PhD from UC Davis in English literature. She now teaches at the University of La Verne in southern California. Along with poetry, Jane writes fiction, creative nonfiction, literary criticism, and music. She is also a certified midwife.

In addition to Song of the Selkie, she is the author of many other poetry collections, including Sanctuary, Rising: Poems for America, and Transfiguration: A Midwife’s Birth Poems. She has also made several recording projects, “Songs from the Secret Life,” “Love-Song,” and, with her brother Andrew Beal, “The Jazz Bird.”

Visit Jane at janebeal.wordpress.com.

Jamie Graham Duprey

Jamie Graham Duprey is not (yet) a New York Times best-selling author, but she loves reading books that are. A sucker for inspirational sports movies and a coach at heart, Jamie loves finding the best in—and encouraging—everyone she meets. She recently followed her pastor husband’s call from the mountains of Montana to the Black Hills of South Dakota, but knows very well that the Holy Spirit has a sense of humor and doesn’t pretend to know where she, her just-keeps-getting-cuter husband, three adorably hilarious children, and their Wackadoodle Ozzie, may be blown next. The Yellow Sports Bra is her debut novel.

Visit Jamie at https://www.coachduprey.com/

Rochelle Distelheim

Rochelle Distelheim’s writing has been awarded the Gival Press Short Story Competition Prize, the Katharine Anne Porter Prize, the Salamander Second Prize, numerous Illinois Arts Council Literary Awards, and a Ragdale Foundation Fellowship. It was a finalist in the Glimmer Train Emerging Writers Competition and has been nominated several times for the Best American Short Stories and the Pushcart Prize. Jerusalem as a Second Language has received both the William Faulkner Gold Medal for Novel-in-Progress and the William Faulkner Gold Medal for Novel. Rochelle’s debut novel, Sadie in Love, was published in 2018.

Visit Rochelle at rdistelheimauthor.com.

Nandini Bhattacharya

Nandini Bhattacharya was born and raised in India and has called the United States her second home for the last thirty years. Wherever she has lived, she has generally turned to books for answers to life’s big and small questions. Her short stories have been published in Meat for Tea: the Valley Review, Storyscape Journal, Raising Mothers, The Bacon Review, The Bangalore Review and Ozone Park Journal. She was first runner-up for the Los Angeles Review Flash Fiction contest (2017-2018), a finalist for the Fourth River Folio Contest for Prose Prize (2018), long-listed for the Disquiet International Literary Prize (2019), and a finalist for the Reynolds-Price International Women’s Literary Award (2019). Love’s Garden is her debut novel. She is working on a second novel titled Homeland Blues. She lives outside Houston with her family and two marmalade cats.

Visit Nandini at https://www.nandinibhattacharyawrites.com/

Susan Lohafer

Susan Lohafer is a graduate of Harvard University (B.A., magna cum laude), Stanford University (M.A. in Creative Writing) and New York University (Ph.D. in American Literature). During her academic career at the University of Iowa, she specialized in short fiction theory. Her books include Coming to Terms with the Short Story and Reading for Storyness: Preclosure Theory, Empirical Poetics, and Culture in the Short Story, as well as the coedited volume Short Story Theory at a Crossroads. Shorter works include the short story entry in The Cambridge Companion to American Fiction After 1945, a personal essay listed as a Notable Essay of 2011 in The Best American Essays 2012, and a few short stories in venues like The Southern Review. For many years, she was the academic program director of the biennial International Conference on the Short Story in English. Her teaching areas included American Literature, short fiction history and theory, and a signature workshop course in the University of Iowa’s M.F.A. Program in Nonfiction. She now lives with her husband in Tennessee.

Dave Mehler

Dave Mehler lives in Newberg, Oregon, moving there with wife and kids in the late 90s, to take over ownership of Oregon’s longest running coffeehouse. He is the editor of the literary journal, Triggerfish Critical Review. His chapbook, God Truck Nature appeared in the chapbook anthology, Burning Gorgeous: seven 21st century poets, published by a friend he met while administrating the online global poetry board and forum, The Critical Poet. He began serving on the board of the Oregon Poetry Association in the fall of 2019. As Roadworthy winds its way toward publication, he is at work revising a manuscript of prose poems pertaining to his driving job for a landfill near Portland.